Galactic Gorge | Andy Davey


Location: Flat Top Hill, Central Otago | Date: 02/09/2021

Milky Way standing over the lights of Alexandra and the Mata-au meandering through Roxburgh Gorge.

This shot was taken in early September when, just after dark, the Milky Way appears out of the twilight standing vertically in the North East night sky. I’d been planning this shot for a few months, looking for the best positions to take this, while also getting a good perspective of the Mata-au down in the Clutha Gorge.

There are some wonderful places for all kinds of photography in the Butchers Dam/Flat Top Hill Doc Reserve. Crazy rock formations, usually still water for reflections, Southern prospect for Aurora displays, lots of trails and MT bike tracks. A photographers dream, and just 5 minutes from Alexandra.

This image is a composite of six images to make a vertical panorama.


Media Type:

Metal Print | 30cm x 60cm

Price: $750

Camera:

Fujifilm X-A3
f3.5
ISO 6400
30 seconds
Composite as panorama of multiple shots




Peach Aurora over Butchers Dam | Andy Davey


Location: Butchers Dam, Central Otago

Aurora Australis display over Butchers Dam, 27th March 2022

The 2022 astro season got off to a cracking start with multiple Aurora displays and good conditions and timing with which to see them. Entering the ‘Solar Maximum’ period as we are may lead to many more shows like this over the next couple of years.

The red colours in an Aurora are usually found at the higher altitudes, with the greens at lower. Because we are usually looking at Auroras that are actually hundreds or thousands of kilometers away. We can sometimes only see the ‘red crown’ (or peach as it came through on this night), but this was obviously close enough to also see the lower altitude greens.


Media Type:

Metal Print | 60cm x 40cm

Price: $750

Camera:

Fujifilm X-A3
f3.5
ISO 6,400
30 second



Waiting for the Ghost Train | Andy Davey


Location: Poolburn Gorge, Central Otago

Admiring the star light at the end of the tunnel.

The early spring Milky Way standing over the entrance to Poolburn Tunnel No 2 on the Otago Central Rail Trail. Also visible in the shot is the Southern Cross, the pointers and Large Megallanic Cloud.

The Poolburn Gorge is one of the most spectacular and interesting sections of the OCRT, as it clings to the edge of the steep sided gorge, with the Ōmakau (Idaburn) rushing below. The complete lack of artificial light makes it ideal for star gazing. Walking through the tunnels in the dark really gets you night vision working!

This shot was taken on one of the many reconnaissance rides I did into the Poolburn Gorge in preparation for the Cycle to the Stars initiative. It was the first time I’d taken a real life human guinea pig. She survived (and thoroughly enjoyed it)!!


Media Type:

Metal Print | 30cm x 60cm

Price: $750

Camera:

Fujifilm X-A3
f3.5
ISO 6,400
20 seconds




Alby and the Aurora | Andy Davey


Location: Mitchell’s Cottage, Fruitlands, Central Otago | Date: 10/04/2022

Not often I do a selfie, and even more rare it is for Alby to remain still enough for a long exposure night shot. Thankfully, with the near full moon it only had to be for 8 seconds.

It was a glorious night, with the moon helping to light up the historic Mitchell’s Cottage and it’s well maintained grounds. One of my favourite astro shoot locations.

The Aurora Australis appeared exactly as forecast and put on a mesmerising display including rays visible to the naked eye. This shot is a compression of 8 seconds of light and colour captured by the digital camera. We cannot see all this colour with our eyes, the rays appear greyish, and the magenta glow which blocks out the usually visible dim stars, is sensed more than seen.


Media Type:

Metal Print | 40cm x 30cm

Price: $450

Camera:

Fujifilm X-A3
iso 64000
f3.5
8 seconds



Southern Lights Vs Scrapyard Lights | Andy Davey


Location: Alexandra Airport, Central Otago | Date: 02/04/2022

Lights of the Aurora Australis dancing over Kopuwai (Obelisk, Old Man Range), obliterated by lighting at the end of Boundary Road.

This image is a good illustration of how the wrong lighting solutions can effect many peoples views of the night sky. There are thousands of lights in Alexandra that do not hamper viewing or photographing the night sky. And there are just a dozen or so that are wrong, have a greater negative effect than all the other thousands combined.

I have taken many shots in my garden or elsewhere around town and captured the Aurora, Milky Way and most of the other features of the dark skies. This would not be possible from Molineux Estates or anywhere near North end of town because of these lights.


Media Type:

Metal Print | 60cm x 30cm

Price: $450

Camera:

Fujifilm X-A3
iso 6400
f3.5
15 seconds



Mata-au Aurora | Andy Davey


Location: Roxburgh Gorge, Central Otago | Date: 01/04/2022

April 1st Aurora Australis reflecting off the waters of the Mata-au (Clutha) from deep within Roxburgh Gorge.

Chose this location about 4km from the middle of downtown Alexandra to capture the forecast Aurora because of it’s Southerly twist, and hoped for some cool reflections and silhouettes. Mission accomplished.

Cycling the twisty Roxburgh Gorge Cycle Trail in the dark was an added bonus to the adventure.


Media Type:

Metal Print | 45cm x 30cm

Price: $450

Camera:

Fujifilm X-A3
iso 6400
f3.5
30 Seconds



Moon over the Taiaroa Head Lighthouse | Dilanka Wijesekara


Location: Aramoana Beach | Date: 16/04/2022

This is one of my dream shots. I planned this shot ages ago, and finally, I succeeded in my 8th attempt. The Aramoana is windy and cloudy most of the time. It is tough to find a clear sky to capture the full moon rising over the horizon even though it is in clear middle of the sky. Very dark thick clouds always cover the horizon. In my last unsuccessful attempt, I realised that the Taiaroa Head lighthouse is approximately 56 meters high from sea level. Then the next full moon rising day, I successfully plan this shot.


Media Type:

framed print | 61cm x 49cm

Price: $350

Camera:

Sony A7r ii
f5.6
Iso 1200
1/30 seconds



Tī kōuka | Izumi Schmidt


Location: Wanaka | Date: 04/07/2021

One of the most iconic and distinctive trees in New Zealand, tī kōuka (cabbage tree), under the sparkling milky way.

It was close to new moon, and I was staying in my friends’ house in Wanaka. When the bedtime came, I apologized that there would be noise from their garden, walking and carrying heavy things, but it would be only me. “So please do not worry, or do not shoot me!”. They had a great collection of trees and interesting objects, but the Wanaka town side was too bright. So I was looking for the darker side, with many stars and interesting objects as foreground. It was a luxury to be able to photograph just a few minutes away from my bedroom!


Media Type:

Framed Print | 30.8cm x 43cm

Price: $400

Camera:

Fuji GFX
23mm
ISO6400
F4
S20




Keyhole | Izumi Schmidt


Location: Aramoana, Dunedin | Date: 02/03/2022

It was new moon and sky was clear, so I headed to Aramoana to bathe in starlight. The tide was low, so I could go further away from the characteristic rock – Keyhole – to get the whole view.

After I came home, I came across this passage by the director of Harvard College Observatory Harlow Shapley(1929).

“We are made of the same stuff as stars, so when we study astronomy we are in a way only investigating our remote ancestry and our place in the universe of star stuff. Our very bodies consist of the same chemical elements found in the most distant nebulae, and our activities are guided by the same universal rules”

As is famous as Carl Sagen’s quote, “We are made of star-stuff”, literally. Pretty fantastic, humbling, and exciting bottom line, for all astrophotographers!


Media Type:

Framed Print | 43cm x 30.8cm

Price: $400

Camera:

Fuji GFX
23mm
ISO 1600
F4
30s



The Grain Shed | John Ecksmann


Location: Central Otago

The Grain Shed panorama image was created by stitching 67 images together and presented in a crackle finished frame. size 570 x 440mm ready to hang.


Media Type:

Hand painted frame with crackle finish | 57cm x 44cm

Price: $395

Camera:

Camera and settings.
Sony A7R3 with a Sigma 50mm prime lens
ISO 8000 F2 15sec



Bendu Under the Milky Way | John Ecksmann


Location: Becks Central Otago

The Bendu panorama image was created by stitching 67 images together presented in a hand painted frame, size 570 x 440mm ready to hang.


Media Type:

Hand painted frame with crackle finish | 57cm x 44cm

Price: $395

Camera:

Camera and settings.
Sony A7R3 with a Sigma 50mm prime lens
ISO 8000 F2 15sec



Ophir Bridge under the Milky Way | John Ecksmann


Location: Ophir Central Otago

The Ophir Bridge image was created by stacking 20 Milky Way shots to reduce noise, and then 10 light painted shots blended together, presented in a hand painted rustic frame, size 570 x 440mm ready to hang.


Media Type:

Hand painted frame with crackle finish | 57cm x 44cm

Price: $395

Camera:

Sony A7R3 with a Tampon 17-28mm lens @17mm
ISO 6400 F2.8 25sec



The Bakehouse | John Ecksmann


Location: Central Otago

The Bakehouse was created by stacking 15 Milky Way images to reduce noise and 20 light painted foreground images which were blended together, presented in a hand painted frame, size 570 x 440mm ready to hang.


Media Type:

Hand painted frame with crackle finish | 57cm x 44cm

Price: $395

Camera:

Sony A7R3 Tamron 17-28mm @ 17mm
ISO 6400 F2.8 15secs



Downs Road Aurora | John Ecksmann


Location: Central Otago

The Downs Road Aurora panorama image was created by stitching 67 images together presented in a hand painted frame, size 570 x 440mm ready to hang.


Media Type:

Hand painted frame with crackle finish | 57cm x 44cm

Price: $395

Camera:

Camera and settings.
Sony A7R3 with a Sigma 50mm prime lens
ISO 8000 F2 10sec



Homestead Hut | John Wekking


Location: Homestead Reserve, Hawkdun Runs Road, Central Otago | Date: 20/05/2021

Homestead hut on partial moon night.

My favorite accessible hut, nicely illuminated with a waxing moon, lighting up the landscape as well. Not recorded were the four stags that bounded into the car headlights on the roadway to this site.

I love the blue sky and golden landscape hues in this image plus the window reflections from the hut.




Karitane | Kavan Chay


Location: Karitane, Otago | Date: 31/01/2022

One of my personal goals this year was to shoot more astrophotography locally, as I strongly believe that Otago/Southland has some of the best skies in the country. I’d found this particular spot online prior to finding it on a map and planning a Milky Way core shot, but had to wait for the right time.

All of my astrophotography has been with my 50mm lens for a while, which means that I’ve had to adopt a large format panoramic technique when shooting. Part of the challenge here is making sure that when I do this, I get the white balance, exposure and contrast consistent across all frames (as well as get enough frames).

It results in a nicer image, but a lot more work in processing, especially since I also use a heavy star reduction (personal preference).

However, I always keep the larger/brighter stars in my images. For this one, the stars Hadar and Rigil Kentaurus can be spotted at the top of the image (the brightest stars), whilst you can also see the likes of Antares in the Rho Ophiuchi region to the left side of the bright core region.


Media Type:

Framed print, fine art paper (310gsm) | 44cm x 56cm

Price: $350

Camera:

Nikon Z7, Nikkor Z 50mm f1.8S, Skywatcher Star Adventurer Pro




Nugget Point Milky Way | Larryn Rae


Location: Nugget Point Lighthouse | Date: 08/05/2018

The Milky way Rises above this little lighthouse.

I have always wanted to capture this scene and when it finally happened, I could not have been more stoked with the result. Notoriously difficult to shoot due to the often ferocious winds, I finally managed a somewhat calm night and made the most of the clear weather window I was given.


Media Type:

Framed Print / Metal print | cm x cm

Price: $550

Camera:

Canon 6D
f2.2
10 sec
iso1000




Springvale Surprise with the Otago Rescue Helicopter | Leeanne Jenkins


Location: Springvale | Date: 02/04/2022

Chasing the aurora we stopped by a place I often photograph, and was surprised to see this Tractor sitting begging to be photographed, the Milky Way was rising and the opportunity or luck was on my side. My husband stood with the head torch on the tractor for 20 secs and after playing with the ISO then set it to 3200.
As I took the shot the Otago Rescue Helicopter came over the hill, totally unexpected, it then added the orange red dots to the picture, talk about frustrated, but on reflection changed my mind as it added to the story of the picture, a week later I went back to that same spot and the tractor was gone. I will not get another quite like this one again.


Media Type:

Chromeulux | 60cm x 46cm

Price: $950

Camera:

Canon 90D
ISO3200 20sec
Samyang 2.8/14mm open to infinity



Orion over Hereweka | Paul Le Comte


Location: Hoopers Inlet, Otago Peninsula, Dunedin | Date: 26/03/2022

A forecast Aurora Australis was underway as I headed to Hoopers Inlet on Otago Peninsula, but sadly, the best of the display had passed before darkness descended over Dunedin. However, more often than not, the shot you were intending to capture isn’t the one you come away with, this was one of those nights.

As I had been playing around with 50mm (lens) astro recently, I thought I’d make a panorama of Orion above Hereweka (Harbour Cone, 315m). The resulting 7 image panorama has a vastly different feel to my usual wide angle panoramas of the night sky. Normally the glow of the nebula & other such objects is lost when shooting at 16mm wide, but the 50mm focal length allows more attention to detail of objects in the night sky, & Orion’s Nebula is clearly visible above the summit.

The boat sheds of Hoopers Inlet have provided photographers a focal point for their images for many years. But because Hereweka is often in silhouette due to the light pollution of Dunedin city to the SW, the maunga is often overlooked. Illuminating the foreground, the rising full moon provided the perfect solution to this for me.


Media Type:

Framed Print | 70cm x 50cm

Price: $450

Camera:

Nikon D750
Nikkor 50mm Lens f/1.8
ISO 800
15 Seconds



She’s a hard road to the perfect night sky | Paul Le Comte


Location: Nugget Point Lighthouse | Date: 02/05/2022

Sometimes locations & shots are popular cliches because of their stunning beauty, the lighthouse at Nugget Point on the Catlins coast being one of those locations.

It may seem strange to include an image with so many clouds covering the Milky Way, but I think this image perfectly illustrates just how hard we have to work to get the perfect shot, & ultimately nature isn’t perfect, despite what you see on Instagram.

We all know this shot, the galactic core of the Milky Way rising above the lighthouse, cool blue tones & crisp sharp stars. However this night, after a 90min drive from Dunedin, within minutes of climbing the precarious track up the cliff & setting up my gear the clouds came in fast from the west. I rushed to get at least one super wide panorama in before I lost the view.

The sky was actually glowing this warm light due to the effect of the cloud cover and a decent sea mist off the coast, & I feel it would be disingenuous to ‘correct’ the white balance to the familiar cooler night sky blues.

As much as I’d love to capture the ‘perfect’ lighthouse astro image, not sure what that actually is & I’m super happy with this image.


Media Type:

| cm x cm

Price: $500

Camera:

Nikon D750
Tokina 11-16mm
f/2.8
ISO 2500
25 seconds
7 image panorama



Airglow Rainbow – Ahuriri Valley Lindis | Rachel Gillespie


Location: Ahuriri Valley, Lindis | Date: 03/04/2019

At first glance in back of the camera I had to recheck my white balance as it appeared a strange silver colour on that tiny screen, turned out to be one of the biggest airglow scenes I have shot with an array of different colours and the Milky Way early rising, Airglow being particles of self illuminated gases in the atmosphere, it was quite new to me and since I have captured many different wild and wonderful airglow images. This spot just happens to also be where the Mulan movie set was on private land on Ben Avon Station so an extra special capture, hard to replicate

The Ahuriri Valley is one of my favourite dark sky places in the South Island with many compositions and very little light pollution to be seen

I hope you enjoy it as much as I do


Media Type:

Canvas on Frame | 50cm x 41cm

Price: $495

Camera:

Canon EOS 6D MKI
Samyang 24mm
15 seconds ISO 5000 F2.8
2 image stitch



Gate to the Milky Way Galaxy – Ahuriri Valley Lindis | Rachel Gillespie


Location: Ahuriri Valley, Lindis | Date: 03/03/2019

The feeling this image gives me is the different layers all captured in one shot, just a bit like life itself, from the weedy flowers on the ground right up to the awe of the magnificent Milky Way Galaxy, Like life we choose where to position our heart and mind, what vibration we choose for ourselves


Media Type:

Canvas on Frame | 50cm x 33cm

Price: $495

Camera:

Canon EOS 6D MKI
Samyang 24mm
15 seconds ISO 8,000 F2.8
Single Image



Kaleidos Auroras Australis | Stephen Patience


Location: Poolburn, Central Otago | Date: 16/04/2015

In mid-April of 2015, there was rather large display of the Aurora Australis with relatively clear skies in Central Otago. The beams were visible to the naked eye flashing overhead in the dark of the night sky. It was the first aurora I had ever witnessed. This is one of my best frames from the most intense display throughout the whole time-lapse sequence that reminds me of looking into a kaleidoscope, as a child.


Media Type:

Metal print | 76cm x 51cm

Price: $990

Camera:

Nikon D810, 18mm, ISO 2500, 1/200s, f:2.8



Noir Core of the Galactic Pinot | Stephen Patience


Location: Pisa Mooring, Cromwell | Date: 15/10/2020

Getting a grape vine aligned for the setting of the Milky Way has always been my desire as an astro-photographer. Capturing the image with a setting Milky Way was easily achieved by setting up a time-lapse then getting the shot on a clear night. I was lucky enough to have a vehicle shine some light onto the foreground in this shot which greatly helped by providing further definition and detail.


Media Type:

| cm x cm

Price: $790

Camera:

Nikon D810, 14-24mm at 14mm, 3200 ISO, 20 seconds at f:2.8



Comet Neowise Over Mount Pisa | Stephen Voss


Location: Pisa Moorings, Central Otago | Date: 08/08/2020

In August 2020 Comet Neowise became visible to observers in the Southern Hemisphere, having already put on an impressive display for northern hemisphere observers. It was past it’s brightest by this stage, but it still made a stunning object for a small telescope .This image, a composite of several 30 second exposures, as the comet skimmed over the Pisa Mountains before setting to the northwest


Camera:

Camera: Nikon D810A
Lens is a Televue-76, Apochromatic Refractor, 480mm, 0.8x focal reducer, f/5.6
ISO 6400
5 x 30 sec exposures, tracked and stacked



47 Tucanae | Stephen Voss


Location: Mount John University Observatory, Lake Tekapo | Date: 20/06/2020

An example of one of the most spectacular globular clusters in the night sky, 47 Tucanae preserves its best views for Southern Hemisphere observers. Through a telescope the cluster truely comes to life with the tightly pack stars of contrasting colours. This image captured through the 0.6 meter B&C reflector at The University of Canterbury Mount John Observatory.


Camera:

Nikon D810A
ISO 6400
Telescope: Boller & Chivens 0.61m reflector, f/6.5 (focal length 3.9 meters)
Composite of 18 tracked images varying from 10 seconds to 2 mins to produce, aligned and stacked to produce a single HDR image



Meteoric Glow | Stephen Voss


Location: Mount John, Lake Tekapo | Date: 20/06/2020

Sometimes good luck plays a part. While capturing a series of images for a time-lapse atop of Mount John, this bright meteor unexpectedly pierced the sky. Fog had rolled down the lake and enshrouded Tekapo township. Even though this is in the heart of the Mackenzie Dark Sky Reserve, townships still need to have lighting, and the effect of the fog is to diffuse this light causing the whole town to glow. But with well controlled and downward directed light sources, note how the sky still remains dark, with stars visible right to the horizon behind the township.


Camera:

Nikon Df
ISO4000
24 mm lens at f/2.2
30sec exposure



Earth’s Shadow | Stephen Voss


Location: Mount John University Observatory, Lake Tekapo | Date: 26/05/2021

With the total lunar eclipse of 26 May 2021, the moon just grazed through the lower part of Earth’s shadow. This presented a nice opportunity to use a composite series of images moving from pre to post totality to highlight and demonstrate one half of the Earth’s shadow.


Camera:

Nikon D810A
Telescope: AstroPhysics StarFire 6 inch, f/8.5 Apochromatic Refractor
ISO400-800
Exposures of 1/1000, 1/400, 1/100, 2.5 and 6.0 seconds
Tracking on a Losmandy G11 mount



Eta Carina Nebula | Stephen Voss


Location: Pisa Moorings, Central Otago | Date: 12/01/2021

To the naked eye the Eta Carina nebula is a faint smudge of light buried deep in the southern Milky Way. Long photographic exposures through a modest telephoto lens or small telescope reveals a complex region of glowing gas within a rich bed of stars. This image is a composite of multiple 5 minute images, equating to a total exposure time of over 1.5 hours, captured while the imaging telescope accurately tracks the rotating sky


Camera:

Nikon D810A
ISO 640
Telescope: Televue-76 480mm apochromatic refractor, 0.8x focal reducer for a focal ratio of f/5.6
Mount: Losmandy G11, tracking and auto-guided
20 x 5 mins exposures



Poolburn at Night | Victoria Bowman


Location: Poolburn Dam | Date: 01/04/2022

A group of us were fortunate to stay in a fishing hut at Poolburn Dam in April. A quick test shot after dinner revealed the Aurora was firing up, so we shot down to the lake shore. The night was moonless, and absolutely still which gave us great reflections of the milky way, the airglow and the aurora. The lake mist then began to form, which proceeded to fog up our lenses, which ultimately ended out night of photography . So we headed back to the fire in the hut and a have whisky to warm up! The following night there was another aurora too, so a fabulous weekend in the wilderness to explore and inhale our stunning dark skies.


Media Type:

Chromolux | 43cm x 30cm

Price: $550

Camera:

Canon 6D, Samyang 14 mm
f2.8
ISO 3200
25 seconds



Aurora and Sunset Collide | Victoria Bowman


Location: Omakau | Date: 10/04/2022

An early evening aurora was forecasted on 11 April 2022, but the unusual sunset that was caused by volcanic ash in the atmosphere from the Tonga eruption had not waned before the aurora began to appear to the south. Although not the strongest of auroras, it was still pretty and satisfied some of my aurora hunger. The moon was quite bright, which did effect the brightness of the aurora. All in all, a nice night in the company of an opossum and two paradise ducks.


Media Type:

Chromolux | 30cm x 45cm

Price: $550

Camera:

Canon 6D
Samyang 14mm
ISO 3200
25 Seconds



Ghost Sheep | Andy Davey


Location: Palmerston, Otago | Date: 20/03/2021

Aurora Australis partially obscured by Puketapu, clouds and sheep.

Previously displayed at Winterstellar 2021 in Alexandra, Ghost Sheep was one of those freak frames from a sequence taken for a timelapse sequence. I selected the location at a whim while driving down Fleming Road on the outskirts of Palmerston, making my way to Matakaea (Shag Point) to hopefully take some shots of the forecast Aurora. The composition looked good with the hope that the mighty Puketapu would be silhouetted by the Aurora.

The spot I chose was on a small rise, next to a water tank, with my reserve camera on a sheep trough with the camera position finely adjusted with a strategically placed piece of dried sheep poo. The camera was taking 30 second exposures at the time of this shot so I suspect the sheep must of entered stage right about 15 seconds in, then posed real still for the remaining 15 seconds. Not sure why, but very grateful.


Media Type:

Metal Print | 70cm x 50cm

Price: $900

Camera:

Fujifilm X-A3
f3.5
ISO 64000
30 seconds



Weasleys Car | Andy Davey


Location: Palmerston, Otago | Date: 16/03/2021

Magical Milky Way over an old car living wild in a forest near Palmerston, Otago.

A fascinating feature of most farms in the Palmerston area, is that all farmers put aside at least one paddock for growing old cars and other mechanical relics. It reminds me of the old Sinbad film where, instead of dragon teeth, the cockies sow an area of clear ground with rusty nuts and bolts, and out of the ground sprout the skeletons of Ford Anglias and Hilman Imps.

Took a photo of this car on an earlier daytime walk. Was very pleased the next time I passed that they had cut down the trees behind it so I could see the Milky Way. Thank You.


Media Type:

Metal Print | 50cm x 70cm

Price: $750

Camera:

Fujifilm X-A3
f3.5
ISO 6,400
30 second




Mitchell’s Cottage Galactic Aurora | Andy Davey


Location: Fruitlands, Central Otago | Date: 31/08/2019

Aurora Australis with Milky Way setting over the Kopuwai (Old Man Range) and the historic Mitchell’s Cottage.

This photo is quite special to me. All my previous astro photos I had taken were decidedly average and I could not work out why. A text conversation that night with Paul Le Comte, who was out on the Otago Peninsular at the time taking his own Aurora photos, enlightened me to as to what error I was making. Set your iso to max and aperture to widest. Seems obvious now, but I had been reluctant to do that thinking result would be too grainy.

Another memorable note about this evening was that I was joined by my son Matthew for the shoot. Credit for cottage lighting must go to him.

It was also this shot which launched the whole Winterstellar project. Being very pleased with myself, I took it into Central Stories Museum to see if they could help me sell it. I walked out of that meeting having agreed to curate an astrophotography exhibition. Still not sure how that happened!


Media Type:

Metal Print | 60cm x 20cm

Price: $750

Camera:

Fujifilm X-A3
ISO 6400
f3.5
20 second



Torchlight on Puketapu | Andy Davey


Location: Puketapu, Palmerston, Otago | Date: 12/03/2020

Galactic Core rising behind the McKenzie memorial on top of Puketapu, overlooking Palmerston, East Otago.

Spent many nights trying to get some cool shots up here. This one includes me on the top with a torch. The views are spectacular but the wind usually means some innovative solutions are required to steady the tripod. This shot was taken with the tripod bungeed to the bench, also took a star trail sequence with a nearby boulder I had to move to the correct position.

The tower itself is open to the public and provides excellent shelter from the coldest winds. It may be necessary to share the space with some nesting swallows. They may make you jump at first, but are generally hospitable hosts.


Media Type:

Metal Print | 46cm x 30cm

Price: $750

Camera:

Fujifilm X-A3
iso 6400
f 3.5
30 second



Rocky Mountain Stars | Cory Marshall


Location: Rocky Mountain, Wanaka, Otago | Date: 27/04/2022

One of my favourite hikes in Wanaka is Rocky Mountain. In a short hour and a half you get to the peak and have a panoramic view over Lake Wanaka and the surrounding peaks. For this image I hiked up and watched the core of the milky way rise above Roys Peak over Glendu Bay and then waited until around 1230 at night to capture the Milky Way centered over the lake.


Media Type:

Metal print | 91cm x 61cm

Price: $1750

Camera:

Sony A7rIV
Sony 12-24 2.8 @12 mm
ISO 6400
30 second Exposure
5 shot panoramic



Home | Izumi Schmidt


Location: Wanaka | Date: 04/07/2021

This shot was taken at my friends’ who are a very special, adventurous, and generous family. The warmth of the light was as beautiful as the stars above, but that might be because I knew the people inside were beautiful.

Anthroposophist and occultist Rudolf Steiner said interesting things about humans on earth and stars. He said that our human will is concentrated around the middle of our body and all those combined influence earth and are the only things visible from the space. He also said when you look up the sky, you are actually NOT seeing the physically sensible something streaming at you (meaning light). “What you actually see are the inner activities of beings of will and intelligence in the stars.” (Quote from “Influences of Lucifer and Ahriman”).

Well I do not know if this is true, but if so, the color and feel of the “human will” should be similar to this inviting light – or not, we will be in trouble.


Media Type:

Framed Print | 30.8cm x 430cm

Price: $400

Camera:

Fuji GFX
23mm
ISO3200
F 4.5
30s




Lighthouse at Taiaroa Head | Izumi Schmidt


Location: Aramoana, Dunedin | Date: 16/04/2022

Sometimes moon comes out early enough to see the details of the object in foreground. It was one of those nights, and the full moon was coming out as expected – then the clouds also appeared. It became hide and seek between the moon, the lighthouse, and the clouds. I was a little disappointed at first, but in the end, I liked the shot – imperfection is perfect. A bit of Zen.

This shot was taken from the opposite coast of the Taiaroa Head, Aramoana. I used mobile app called “Sun Locator Pro” to find the right spot to be. But what happens is you are never in the right spot, and moon comes up so fast in angle, so you constantly drag your tripod to change the position, click, then drag again – for about 15 minutes or so. It is sort of an embarrassing act especially there would be walkers around you, but it is worth it.


Media Type:

Framed Print | cm x cm

Price: $400

Camera:

SONY RX10M4
ISO 2500
220mm
F4.5



Poppet Head Progress Mine | John Ecksmann


Location: Oturehua, Central Otago

This image was created by stacking 15 Milky Way images for noise reduction and 25 light painted foreground images blended together. Printed on 100% cotton base paper with an elegant textured finish, The frame has a hand painted rust finish. size 940 x 630mm ready to hang.


Media Type:

Hand painted frame with rust finish | 93cm x 63cm

Price: $740

Camera:

Sony A7R3 Tamron 17-28mm @17mm
ISO 6400 F2.8 20secs



Days Gone By | John Ecksmann


Location: Central Otago

This image was created by stacking 10 Milky Way images for noise reduction and 14 light painted foreground images blended together. Printed on 100% cotton base paper with an elegant textured finish, The frame has a hand painted rust finish. size 940 x 630mm ready to hang.


Media Type:

Hand painted rust effect | 94cm x 63cm

Price: $740

Camera:

Sony A7R2 Tamron 17-28mm @17mm
ISO 6400 F2.8 20secs



Welshtown Hut | John Ecksmann


Location: Welshtown Central Otago

This shot was created with a single shot for the Milky Way with 8 light painted foreground shots blended together, presented in a hand painted frame, size 570 x 440mm ready to hang.


Media Type:

Hand painted frame with crackle finish | 57cm x 44cm

Price: $395

Camera:

Sony 6300 Sigma 16mm prime
Foreground ISO 560 20 secs F5.6
Milky Way ISO 6400 20 secs F1.6



Turquoise Dreams | Jordan McInally


Location: The Remarkables, Queenstown, Otago

The Remarkables looking over Queenstown




Explosions of the Sky | Kavan Chay


Location: Taieri Beach, Otago | Date: 02/04/2022

I’ve always wanted to capture an image that had the Milky Way, Magellanic Clouds, Aurora Australis and a focused foreground element all in one- something I’d never managed previously.

Luckily, this year is another year closer to the solar maximum of this solar cycle, which means better chances of seeing better auroral displays. Correspondingly, I’ve had much better luck with bigger displays this year than I ever have in the past.


Media Type:

Framed print, fine art paper | 56cm x 54cm

Price: $400

Camera:

Nikon Z7, Nikkor 50mm f1.8S, Sky-Watcher Star Adventurer Pro



Waipapa Aurora | Larryn Rae


Location: Waipapa Lighthouse | Date: 05/02/2022

The amazing Aurora Australis dances above the southern-most lighthouse of mainland New Zealand.

What started out as a rain soaked and gale force wind night, soon cleared and turned into this crazy scene. I was huddled under a blanket for an our while the mini storm abated and then all the colour and texture of the solar storm came out to play.
I have always wanted to capture the aurora here as it faces directly south so stoked to finally get it!


Media Type:

Framed Print / Metal print | 60cm x 40cm

Price: $750

Camera:

Canon R5 h-alpha modded
f2,8
15sec
iso6400



Milky Way over the Wreck of the Olivia | Les Ladbrook


Location: Omaui, Bluff | Date: 08/10/2017

After several trips to this location prior to this shoot I determined there were several conditions needed to get the image I wanted, including no moon for the sky images, and a moon rising later to light the foreground plus a breeze off the land to blow any sea spray out to sea. A night finally arrived, I phoned a few friends to go with me but none were available so I decided I had to do it alone. About a 25-30-minute walk across farmland, down the hill to the foreshore to reach the location (in the dark). Sitting there in the dead of the night is quite eerie, noise from the sea, cattle moving about and bellowing and other strange noises. The sky images looked fantastic. Nearing midnight, the moon came up and within 10-15 minutes it had illuminated the boat and foreground. Satisfied I had the images I needed, it was a 55-minute route along the foreshore and up the hill through the farmer’s rough cattle paddocks. Arriving back at the car a sigh of relief, no ghosts or stock encountered on the walk out. This is a blend of those 2 images and remains one of my most successful planned images to date. The bonus was the Zodiacal Light lighting up the Galactic Kiwi in the Milky Way.


Media Type:

Metal Print | 60cm x 40cm

Price: $750

Camera:

Nikon D750
Nikkor 14-24m
15 sec @ f2.8, ISO 6400



Super Moon | Michael Cookson


Location: Port Chalmers | Date: 09/02/2020

I’m really pleased how this capture turned out, It’s got a real nautical theme to it with the anchor obviously, but also the relationship with the moon and how it controls the ebb and flow of the tides. They really compliment each other.


Media Type:

Framed Print | 90cm x 75cm

Price: $1500



Running Late | Michael Cookson


Location: Sutton near Middlemarch, Otago | Date: 19/09/2020

Later on in the ‘milky way season’ it changes orientation stretching a long arch that sinks down to the south west horizon through the night. It’s probably my favourite time to photograph it as it fills the frame and offers opportunities for a different direction of shooting and compositions. The old rail hut caught my eye one day as something with a bit of rustic character and situated perfectly to include the night sky. I used some light painting techniques with torch light to bring out some of that character.


Media Type:

Metal Print | 76cm x 51cm

Price: $1000



Wise | Nicholas Allan Doran


Location: Drift Bay, Otago | Date: 27/09/2021

New Zealand is special to me for so many reasons, a significant one of which is its night sky. The southern hemisphere’s nights are the perfect playground for an astrophotographer. Viewing from the northern hemisphere only glimpses of the galactic core are seen as it skims the sky just above the horizon. While here we get to watch as it sails high across the night sky. The galactic core even pays homage to New Zealand by displaying its kiwi readily. Photographed here you can see the kiwi nebula standing atop Cecil Peak as the Milky Way gently sets in the West.


Media Type:

Metal Print | 91cm x 61cm

Price: $1300

Camera:

Canon EOS R
f/2.8
Foreground:
x2 240 seconds
ISO 1250
Sky:
x17 8 seconds
ISO 2500



Home | Nicholas Allan Doran


Location: Coronet Peak | Date: 21/02/2021

This was one of my very first attempts at capturing the Aurora Australis. I had been waiting at least 6 months, as opportunities come few and far between for the sun, moon and cloud cover to all corroborate. When they finally did I headed up Coronet mountain to capture the perfect view of my home topped with the Southern Lights. That night they weren’t very strong compared to other recent storms, but my patience for the right conditions paid off, rewarding me with this amazing scene overlooking the valley.


Media Type:

Metal Print | 40cm x 60cm

Price: $750

Camera:

Canon EOS R
f/2.8
Foreground:
300 seconds
ISO 800
Sky:
15 seconds
ISO 2000



Matariki over Ōmakō Lindis Pass | Paul Le Comte


Location: Ōmako Lindis Pass | Date: 19/01/2020

Linking Te Manahuna (the Mackenzie Basin) with the lakes of Central Otago, the route through Ōmakō Linds Pass from the Waitaki river mouth to Lake Hāwea was vital to Ngāi Tahu mahinga kai (work for food).

Today Ōmakō Lindis Pass is an essential transport route for travellers, tourists, & commerce alike. At 971m it’s the highest pass on the South Island’s state highway network & is world renown for it’s soft warm tussock covered mountain slopes. It is also a phenomenal dark sky location & in summer we are blessed with Matariki shining in the NW sky above the pass.

Having to scale the side of a mountain to get this multi-image long exposure panorama, looking north to Longship Mountain, the vista opened up before me. However after midnight, there’s fewer cars (mainly goods trucking) that I’d hope & this image took over 90 mins to capture enough car & light trucks weaving their way up & down the pass. The flash of light is a Iridium flare caused by the rotation of Iridium satellites around the earth’s orbit, once considered ‘light pollution’ in the night sky, long before SpaceX’s Starlink mega constellation.


Media Type:

Framed Print | 70cm x 50cm

Price: $450

Camera:

Nikon D750
Tokina 11-16mm
f/2.8
ISO 1600
30 seconds



Tunnel Beach Light Trail | Paul Le Comte


Location: Tunnel Beach, Dunedin | Date: 28/09/2019

Normally astrophotographers will go out of their way (literally driving many kilometres) to avoid light pollution when photographing the night sky, however sometimes there are exceptions, & when you’re a night landscape photographer, the rules become even looser.

Tunnel Beach just south of Dunedin is a ocean carved sandstone landscape of caves & arches which is famous for it’s sunrise & sunsets & often populated with as many photographers as sea birds.

I ventured down the steep (150m vertical climb) track to the lookout hoping to capture an aurora that was building in the SW sky. However, I was thwarted by a rising full moon & cloud, but that never stopped me looking for a shot.

On this rare occasion I had the entire location to myself, I thought I’d set up a shot of me walking with my torch to show scale & tell a story about long exposure photography, with the intention of capturing the start of a star trail image. This 6.5minute exposure was more hit than miss, as I had to guess how much light pollution from Dunedin (left) would affect the final shot.


Media Type:

Framed Print | 70cm x 50cm

Price: $450

Camera:

Nikon D750
Tokina 11-16mm Lens
f/5.6
ISO 1600
400 seconds



Hoopers Moonrise Glow | Paul Le Comte


Location: Hoopers Inlet | Date: 25/03/2022

Transferring the image I have in my mind to my camera & ultimately to a final print often takes serendipitous turns, this is one of those images.

I headed to Hoopers Inlet on Otago Peninsula, Dunedin, to capture the Galactic Core of the Milky Way rising over the iconic boat sheds, but simply forgot to check what time moonrise was. As I was setting up I could see the horizon start to glow a warm orange (as is common before the moon gets above the horizon), the glow getting more intense by the second. I knew the minute the full moon rose above the ridge on Scotts Hill the Milky Way would be washed out, so it was a rush to find a composition & get the right settings, balancing the silhouetted hills, the harbour & of course night sky.

The final image shows the glow that results from the longer distance the moon’s light has to travel through the atmosphere when on the horizon, scattering further, as opposed to the cool white/blue light when the full moon is high in the sky.


Media Type:

Framed Print | 50cm x 40cm

Price: $450

Camera:

Nikon D750
Nikkor 50mm
ISO 800
f/1.8
20 seconds
10 image panorama



Smails Beach Aurora | Paul Le Comte


Location: Smails Beach, Dunedin | Date: 31/08/2019

Due to light pollution Smails Beach at the start of Otago Peninsula is about as close to Dunedin as you want to get when photographing the night sky, but when the sky is glowing with the dancing lights of a Kp5 Aurora Australis, it’s less important. This night was one of those nights, aided by the New Moon dark sky.

This Aurora was one of the last large events of Solar Cycle 24 ( and eleven year cycle between 2008-2019) & was seen over most of the South Island. Smails is a wonderful beach & with Bird Island just off shore there’s plenty of visual interest even without the Milky Way or an Aurora. This is a 7 image panorama captures not only the dancing lights of the Aurora, but a wide view of the galactic core of the Milky Way that was very low in the night sky, with the lights of Dunedin spilling over Lawyer’s Head. Top left of the image is the satellite galaxy to ours, the Large Magellanic Cloud, some 158,000 light years from us.


Media Type:

Framed Print | 50cm x 40cm

Price: $450

Camera:

Nikon D750
Nikkor 24-85
f/3.5
ISO 4000
3o seconds



Awakening of the Soul – Ahuriri Valley Lindis | Rachel Gillespie


Location: Ahuriri Valley, Lindis | Date: 09/07/2021

Before the fog rolled in the spectacular Milky Way Galaxy Core rising in front of me presented this special image as I stood out here on my own in the darkest of skies. Some of the most spectacular skies are here in the Ahuriri Valley, for those of us whom have been lucky to spend time in this incredible valley, it offers so many different scenes year around it is a quiet, humbling and solo spiritual adventure

Multirow stitched Panorama 21,138 x 13,467 pixels (814M)


Media Type:

Canvas on Frame | 135cm x 86cm

Price: $995

Camera:

Canon EOS 6D MKI
Samyang 24mm
15 sec ISO 8000 F2.8



People of the Milky Way Galaxy – Lake Ohau | Rachel Gillespie


Location: Lake Ohau

A multirow stitched image shot in October 2020 a piece that reminds us all of our fragility with the timing of the World in that moment
Not sure words are needed further or even important
15,574 x 9304 pixels


Media Type:

Canvas on Frame | 135cm x cm

Price: $995

Camera:

Canon EOS 6D MKI
Samyang 24mm
15 sec ISO 8,000 F2.8



Terrestrial Space Rock | Stephen Patience


Location: Central Otago | Date: 06/04/2019

Situated high on a remote range, this huge rock is the size of a small car and sits precariously balanced, miles from nowhere. While I proudly keep its location a secret from other photographers, the balancing rock sits here as a bold foreground contrasted against the Milky Way, both of which have been here for a very, very long time.


Media Type:

Metal print | 76cm x 51cm

Price: $990

Camera:

Nikon D810, 14-24mm at 14mm, ISO 2000, 20 seconds at f:2.8



Heavens Above | Victoria Bowman


Location: Omakau | Date: 07/07/2019

The photo was taken in July 2019 at around 9pm on a very frosty -5 evening. Even only after about 15 minutes, my lens began to ice up. Not sure who got the biggest fright when this was taken, the pigeons quietly roosting in the shed rafters and having a bright torch waking them up, or the photographer when the pigeons took to flight with nosey flapping wings and dust flying! This is a single image, planned using the PhotoPills app, to help me align the milky way with the apex of the Omakau goods shed.


Media Type:

Framed | 60.5cm x 40cm

Price: $750

Camera:

Canon 6D,
Samyang 14mm
ISO 4000
20 secs



The Vela-Puppis Supernova Remnant complex | Brian Boyle


Location: Speargrass Flat Observatory

The Vela-Puppis supernova remnant (SNR) passes overhead in Otago during late summer. Named after the constellations of the Keel and the Poop Deck in which it lies, this SNR one of the most spectacular regions of the southern sky. The complex actually contains the remnants of the three different supernova whose progenitor stars exploded between 500 and 12000 years ago. The supernova remnant from 12000 years ago is the most extensive in this picture, and is located relatively close to Earth, about 800 light years distant. This image was taken in the light of ionised hydrogen (red), silicon (green) and oxygen (blue) atoms. The diaphanous expanding shells of the supernova remnant are clearly delineated by the ionised oxygen, many of which are sufficiently remarkable to have their own names such the Pencil nebula and the Blue Chilli nebula. Can you spot them?


Media Type:

Metal Print | 60cm x 120cm

Price: $750

Camera:

Nikon AF-S FX 200mm f2, ZWO ASI6200 Monochrome sensor, with Astronomik narrow band filter set. 90 x 300sec exposure (9 hours total)




The Dolphin Head nebula | Brian Boyle


Location: Speargrass Flat Observatory

The Dolphin Head nebula is situated in the constellation of Canis Major, about 10degrees south of brightest star in the sky, Sirius. The nebula is made up of gas expelled from the outer layers of the star at its centre. The star, EZ Canis Majoris, is in a pre-supernova phase, shedding its outer layers as prelude to detonation. The Dolphin Head is about 4500 light years from Earth.

The image was taken using filters tuned to the light from ionised oxygen atoms (blue) and ionised hydrogen atoms (red). Although most of the material is composed of hydrogen, the ionisation state of the gas is such that emission from ionised oxygen shows up strongly in the gas bubble which comprises the Dolphin Head.

The image also contains diffuse emission from the intergalactic gas in the region, almost as if the Dolphin were swimming in an intergalactic coral reef.


Media Type:

Metal Print | 60cm x 90cm

Price: $750

Camera:

TS Hypergraph 200mm f/3.2 telescope, ZWO ASI6200MM sensor, Optolong narrowband filters, 35 x 600sec




The Lambda Centaurus Nebula | Brian Boyle


Location: Speargrass Flat Observatory

Also known as the Running Chicken Nebula (although in this case the chicken is upside down), the Lambda Centaurus nebula is a cloud of glowing gas only a few degrees from Acrux, the brightest star in the Southern Cross. The nebula’s eponymous star is only 470 light yers distant. It is thought to be a number of the Gould Belt, a group of hot young stars, moving through space together, having formed in the last 15-20 million years in the same molecular cloud. The region of gas around to the star is lit up by the star itself, and contains a number of dark knots – dense clumps of molecular gas form which future stars are likely to emerge. As yet, however, no star formation has been detected in any of the globules. The Running Chicken appears to have laid a few eggs, but no-one knows whether they will hatch. This way round the image looks more like a pterodactyl rising than a chicken running.


Media Type:

Metal Print | 90cm x cm

Price: $750

Camera:

TS Hypergraph 200mm f/3.2 telescope, ZWO ASI6200MM sensor, Optolong narrowband filters, 51 x 600sec exposure.



The Large Magellanic Cloud | Brian Boyle


Location: Speargrass Flat Observatory

Omnipresent and readily visible to the naked eye in our Southern skies, at only 150,000 light year from Earth, the Large Magellanic Cloud is the closest large(ish) galaxy to our own Milky Way galaxy. The image, taken in the light of ionised sulphur (red), hydrogen (green) and oxygen (blue) should the barred spiral nature of this galaxy which has been significantly disrupted by tidal interactions with our much heavier Milky Way galaxy and the less massive Small Magellanic Cloud. How would you feel after going a couple of rounds with a giant 100 time heavier than you? The most remarkable features you can also see in this image are the numerous star-forming regions including the giant Tarantula nebula (the blue region to the upper left of the central bar).. Even from this great distance the Tarantula nebula can be seen with the naked eye. If it were as close to the Earth as the Orion Nebula, it would cast shadows at night.


Media Type:

Metal Print | 60cm x 90cm

Price: $750

Camera:

Nikon FX 200mm f2, ZWO ASI6200MM sensor & Astronomik narrow band filter set. 270 x 180sec exposure.




The Dragons of Ara | Brian Boyle


Location: Speargrass Flat Observatory

One of the most spectacular of all nebulae, the Rim Nebula (NGC 6188) lies deep in the deep in the Southern Milky Way passing overhead Otago during autumn and winter.

Located 4000 light years distant in the constellation of Ara (the Altar) the appearance of the nebula gives rise to its more poetic name of The Dragons of Ara. Fortunately the constellation boundaries were drawn such that the Dragons just missed being the constellation of the Carpenter’s Square, otherwise they would have been known as the The Dragons of Norma.

The Dragons of Ara is another star-forming region sculpted by the last group of stars that went supernova in this region. It’s that circle of life thing.

Just below the Dragons is a spinning star with two lobes of material being thrown off.


Media Type:

Metal Print | 60cm x 90cm

Price: $750

Camera:

TS Hypergraph 200mm f/3.2 telescope, ZWO ASI6200MM sensor, Optolong narrowband filters, 56 x 600sec exposure.




The Witch Head Nebula | Brian Boyle


Location: Speargrass Flat Observatory

Space is not only big, but it is also spectacularly messy. This wide field image (about 10 x 7 degrees on the sky) shows the bright star Rigel (top left star of Orion) surrounded by various fragments of interstellar gas and dust, including the appropriately named Witch Head nebula.

The Witch Head nebula is thought to be part of an ancient supernova remnant, with the dust particles in the nebula reflecting the blue light of Rigel. Astronomers has discovered carbon monoxide molecules and protostars within the nebula, suggesting it too will become the site for intense star formation in the future. Another circle of life thing.

Other nebula in this region range from the more diffuse red nebula where the emission from more rarified ionised hydrogen is apparent, to the much denser brown/dark nebula where stars, shrouded from our earthly gaze, are actively forming


Media Type:

Metal Print | 60cm x 90cm

Price: $750

Camera:

Nikon FX 200mm f2, ZWO ASI6200MM sensor & Astronomik narrow band filter set. 42 x 300sec exposure.




The Statue of Liberty Nebula | Brian Boyle


Location: Speargrass Flat Observatory

Anther cloud of glowing gas which lives up to its popular nickname, but the more prosaic formal name of NGC3576. The nebula is 9000 light years from Earth and over 100 light years across. It is situated between the Eta Carina and Running Chicken Nebula, in the region of the Milky Way west of the Southern Cross.
This part of the Southern Milky Way passes almost overhead in Otago during late summer/autumn evenings.
The shape of the nebula, with its delicate sworls and filaments is driven by stellar winds from the young, massive stars embedded with the glowing gas.

The image has been taken in the light of sulphur (red), hydrogen (green) and oxygen (blue), so that the colour – while false to the human eye – still reveal important information about the physics and chemistry of these star forming regions.


Media Type:

Framed Print | 90cm x 60cm

Price: $750

Camera:

TS Hypergraph 200mm f/3.2 telescope, ZWO ASI6200MM sensor, Optolong narrowband filters, 68 x 600sec exposure.



The Antares Region with Blue Horse Head | Brian Boyle


Location: Speargrass Flat Observatory

High in the winter sky, hangs the the bright yellow star of Antares surrounded by the recognisable pincers of Scorpius, the Scopion. However, even a relatively short exposure with a camera reveals the richness of the nebulae in this region, one of the most colourful in the whole sky.

The area includes the Rho Ophuichi star formation nursery, with dark lanes of obscuring dust stretching to the right in this image, all the way down to the the Milky Way.

The Blue Horsehead region to the bottom of this image is caused by interstelllar dust scattered light from the bight star Nu Scorpii half way up the “nose” of the horse.

An ancient globular cluster of stars (Messier 4) is also seen just to the left of Antares, itself shrouded in a yellow reflection nebula.

All in all, an egregiously over-achieving part of the sky, rising in the eastern sky as you walk outside from the exhibition tonight.


Media Type:

Framed Print | 60cm x 90cm

Price: $750

Camera:

Canon 6D Mark II, 200mm f/2.8L USM lens. Used at f/4. 60 x 300sec.




The Matterhorn | Brian Boyle


Location: Speargrass Flat Observatory

Most exhibitions permit one indulgent piece by an artist. This is mine. To my knowledge the piece of the sky has not featured in an exhibition before. This is an exceptionally faint nebula of glowing gas located in the constellation of Puppis (The Poop Deck), which passes overhead here during summer/autumn. It is so overlooked it doesn’t even have a recognised name.

Recently those that have taken images of this region have dubbed it The Mountain. I would go further and call it the Mattherhorn, not only for its resemblance to the mountain in Switzerland, but also to celebrate the famous schist rock hazard on the 17th hole at Arrowtown golf course.

Either way, it’s the Poop Mountain.


Media Type:

Metal Print | 90cm x 60cm

Price: $750

Camera:

TS Hypergraph 200mm f/3.2 telescope, ZWO ASI6200MM sensor, Optolong narrowband filters, 60 x 600sec exposure.



ISS Over Dunedin | Paul Le Comte


Location: Company Bay, Dunedin | Date: 29/04/2020

No matter how many hundreds of times I have watched in wonder at the International Space Station crossing over above me, I will never get bored of it. It blows my mind that every time they cross above us there’s crew members living, doing normal daily things, like eating, sleeping, exercising, reading, working & relaxing.

Using apps on your smart phone you can track when the space station will fly over your location, which direction to look in, & how long it will be visible for.

To take photos of the ISS doesn’t require the most expensive gear, just a tripod, a camera that can take 10+ second exposures & that’s about it, heck even model Galaxy & iPhones can capture them these days.

This image is a merging of 4 shots of Dunedin looking back from Company Bay on Otago Peninsula. The 1st shot was only 2 seconds to counter the bright glow of the city just after sunset. Then 3x 30 second images to track the movement of the ISS above Dunedin. Each image was processed in Lightroom & then blended in Photoshop.

1 of 4 images showing the variety of images of the ISS you can capture.


Media Type:

Matted Print | 36cm x 28cm

Price: $65

Camera:

Nikon D750
Tokina 11-16mm @ 11mm
ISO 100/800
F/2.8
2 seconds & 30 seconds



The luck of the light | Paul Le Comte


Location: Otago Peninsula, Dunedin | Date: 22/10/2019

Sometimes when shooting the night sky, lucky or serendipitous things happen, as in this image. For this image of the galactic core of our Milky Way with the International Space Station to have happened I needed a bit of planning & a lot of luck.

This is shot from in the middle of Highcliff Road on the top of Otago Peninsula, it’s not one image, & that’s where the luck comes into it. I knew the Milky Way was going to be in a relatively low angle in the sky, so with my simple wide lens I was going to be more than able to get it in with the camera on it’s side, or what we call portrait aspect. But because my field of view is vertical more than wide, I needed to get at least 7 images side to side (creating the classic panorama), and this is where the luck was needed, standing in the middle of the road taking 7, 8, or 9x 30 second exposures, I really needed luck in that no cars were driving towards me during the shoot – as I would have to move the tripod & start all over again. Except this time, given the ISS tracker app telling me it was crossing the sky in that direction at that time, I knew/guessed the ISS would cross somewhere near the middle – end of the panorama.

Incredibly, despite it being a road in which cars do drive on at night, not one single car came along at this time, & with my camera set up on the tripod in the middle of the road, on the 6th & 7th frame of the panorama, the ISS passed over Dunedin from a WSW to ENE direction! Luck & planning. The rest was easy, clean up the images with basic adjustments, let Lightroom stitch the images together & there we have a super wide panorama of the Milky Way with the International Space Station crossing through the image.


Media Type:

Matted Print | 36cm x 28cm

Price: $65

Camera:

Nikon D750
ISO 640
f/3.5
9x 30 second exposures



Guy Fawkes light show | Paul Le Comte


Location: Company Bay, Dunedin | Date: 04/11/2019

Shooting the ISS in itself is a fun thing to do, but incorporating it with a location, a subject, on in this case, during an event can really add to the story you are telling.

By pure dumb luck (and probably some easily explained reason of orbits x circumference of the earth etc), each year on Guy Fawkes night, the International Space Station (ISS) crossed over Dunedin early in the evening. This evening, literally across the road from my house on what locals call ‘the mound’ some folk were letting off fireworks on a chilly but clear night. I knew when the ISS was crossing the sky & all I had to do was climb the wee hill, & get the fireworks between me & the city with the ISS crossing over. Of course I also really had to hope that they lit a nice sky rocket or other pyrotechnics while the ISS was crossing over the sky, or a ‘cheat’ would have to take place, in which I blend several images together in a composite – but I didn’t really want to do that. Thankfully the ISS did cross the sky just as this simple firework was doing it’s thing. This is 4x 15 second images blended together to capture the movement of the ISS over our skies & several flashes of the firework.


Media Type:

A4 Matted Print | 30cm x 21cm

Price: $50

Camera:

Nikon D750
ISO 400
f/7.1
4x 15 second exposures



Hoopers interlopers | Paul Le Comte


Location: Hoopers Inlet, Otago Peninsula | Date: 25/06/2019

The final of my 4 images depicting the International Space Station crossing the skies above New Zealand illustrates how sometimes objects in the sky cross over your field of view, & depending on what you were shooting & how you feel about these objects in the sky, you either see them as fun additions or light pollution.

Here I was set up in Hoopers Inlet on Otago Peninsula (before the storm took out the famous boat shed), hoping to capture a relatively long sunset to aurora Timelapse. To do this you choose your location, settings on the camera, lock everything down on a steady tripod & let the camera with it’s intervalometer (internal, or external intervalometer release cable) take images every x number of seconds.

Just after sunset, during blue hour, just as the southern sky started to glow a pale blue of the incoming aurora, in a single 30 second frame, both the International Space Station, & an Iridium Flare happened in the top right hand of the image (would later appear as a quick flash in the Timelapse, barely noticeable), I took a quick note of the time & hoped the camera caught these two things. Sure enough the ISS crossed the sky from the middle right to the top of the image, appearing as a strong white line, & the Iridium Flare (light reflecting off the Iridium Satellite as it tumbles in orbit).

A little bit of luck & not the image I was looking for, some would say light pollution, but in this case I think it tells a nice little story of science photo bombing my Timelapse.

Shooting the ISS can be fun, it doesn’t need to be technical, and it’s a wonderful reminder of the incredible achievements of humanity & science.


Media Type:

A4 Matted Print | 30cm x 21cm

Price: $50

Camera:

Nikon D7100
ISO 400
f/5.6
30 seconds



Matariki and the Taurus/Perseus molecular cloud complex | Brian Boyle


Location: Speargrass Flat Observatory

Matariki holds a special place in Maori culture. A time to celebrate the New Year by remembering the dead of last year and making an offering to replenish the stars. This image, taken over four sub-zero nights captures the open cluster, the blue reflection nebula immediately surrounding it and the much larger Taurus-Perseus molecular cloud complex in which it is embedded. The Baby Eagle or Vulture Head nebula is visible towards the bottom right. The star cluster is relatively young by astronomical standards, only 400 million years old, comprising mostly massive blue stars, enhanced by the scattered blue light from the clouds of gas and dust surrounding it. This region of sky only rises to 20 degrees above the horizon at a latitude of 45 degrees South, and it is a testament to the dark skies of Otago that these faint interstellar cloud complexes can still be imaged with just a Digital SLR camera.


Media Type:

Metal Print | 120cm x 60cm

Price: $750

Camera:

Canon 6D MkII 200mm f2.8L USM Lens (operated at f4) 300 x 120 sec (10hours total)



Blackhead Startrail | Yang Zheng


Location: Blackhead, Dunedin | Date: 02/09/2021

Mine field with star trails


Camera:

SONY ILCE-7RM4
ISO 100
f 3.2
2174 seconds



Mount Cargill Communications Tower | Yang Zheng


Location: Mount Cargill, Dunedin | Date: 06/08/2021

Mount Cargill Communications Tower with the Milky Way.


Camera:

SONY ILCE-7RM4
ISO 6400
f 2.8
25 seconds


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